sailing Archives - Small Boats Magazine

David W. Dillion Plans at Mystic Seaport’s Website

Special thanks to friend-of-the-magazine Ben Fuller for bringing it to our attention that 37 drawings by David W. Dillion of 15 different designs have recently appeared on Mystic Seaport Museum’s website. The plans are now available for purchase, too.

From the archives: Read about the Woods Hole Spritsail Boat, one of the boats Dillion documented for Mystic Seaport.

From Mystic Seaport: “David W. Dillion was an engineering draftsman before establishing a career as a freelance boat documentation specialist. He measured and drew more than seventy boats up to a hundred feet in length and taught lines-taking at the WoodenBoat School and half a dozen maritime museums across the United States. His plans have been published in WoodenBoat and other periodicals. He was the major contributor to the Museum Small Craft Association’s publication Boats, A Manual for Their Documentation.

List of Available Dillion Plans

North Haven Peapod, 13’x 3’10″. Carvel planked.

Nova Scotia Gunning Skiff, 14’9″ x 4’2”. Carvel planked, double ender.

Five Islands Skiff, 15′ x 4’5″. Round hull, transom stern, carvel planked.

Abaco Dinghy. Owned by Lance Lee, carvel planked, transom stern. No centerboard.

Bindals Boat, 15′-10″ x 4′3″. Danish built in the Norse style. Owned 1985 by James S. Rockefeller, Jr. Study plans only to show construction details.

Whitney Gunning Float duck hunting boat for oar or scull, 15’7″ x 48″. Carvel planked, transom stern.

Rangeley Boat, Herb Ellis No. 2, 17′2″ x 4′2″.

Whitehall pulling/sailing boat built by Orvil Young during 1968-69 as a recreational boat for the schooner ROSEWAY of Camden, Maine, 16′3″ x 4′5″. Based on fig. 73 of Chapelle’s American Small Sailing Craft. Carvel planked.

Rangeley Boat, Herbert N. Ellis #3; a wide transom attempts to make a more stable outboard version.

Westport Sharpie Firefly, 12’3″x 4’4″. Flat-bottomed and cross planked skiff, centerboard, two planks per side.

Lighthouse Peapod, 14’2 “x 4’8”. Carvel planked.

Matinicus Peapod, Sailing, 15’ x 4’6″. Based on John Gardner’s plans and documented as-built by the Apprenticeshop in Rockland, Maine. Lapstrake with centerboard.

Creole Skiff Gibben Dupre, 17′9″ x 4′9″. Built by Alexander Giroir at Pierre Part, Louisiana, in 1934.

Canoe by J.R. Robertson, 15′ x 30″. Built at Auburndale, Mass. in the early 1900s. Lapstrake construction.

Rushton canoe Ugo, 16′ x 30″. Smooth-skin lapstrake.

2019 Small Reach Regatta

The idea of the SRR is to gather together small sail-and-oars boats for sailing, with the same kind of camaraderie and appreciation that the ERR has established. We will sail on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. This year, we plan a one-way sail from Herrick Bay to the waters off the campground, where we’ll anchor, so secure anchoring ability is especially important. The next day will be a return to Herrick Bay. Final haulouts, trailering, and departure will take place on Sunday, July 28, vacating the campground before noon and the boatyard as soon as possible.

Click here for full details about the event and how to sign up.

Boating safety is always a priority at the SRR, and the fleet is accompanied at all times by a chase fleet, usually six fast powerboats. Participating boats are required to meet a checklist of safety equipment. Our safety demonstrations in years past have included a firing of emergency flares and a deliberate capsize and self-recovery. We take safe seamanship seriously.

E-mail is our preferred method of communication. We’ll get back to you as soon as we can. We hope to see you this summer on the coast of Maine!

For more information, contact

Tom Jackson <tom@woodenboat.com>; or
David Wyman, <david@dwymanpe.com>.

The Dramatized History of the Bantry Bay Gig in Camden

At Camden Library’s Amphitheater, Mick Delap, a writer, historian and avid sailor in retirement after a career in journalism at the BBC, and Apprenticeshop founder Lance Lee will host an interestingly presented history of the Bantry Bay Gigs of International Atlantic Challenge fame.

Delap, with a cast of actors, will perform a theatrical version of important moments in the gigs’ history accompanied by a duo from Belfast, Maine who will play Irish music on authentic instruments.

Following that, Lee will describe the modern history of the gig after it was “rediscovered” in 1944 and he’ll talk about the beginnings of the Atlantic Challenge and its mission to further international camaraderie among sailors. Following his presentation, he will invite the audience for a close look at a model of a gig that he will bring for the Q&A session.

 

FMI:
Email Cayla at the Camden Public Library cmiller@librarycamden.org
Email Heidi Kaufmann at vrkaufmann@gmail.com or call her at 207 326 9386.

Gathering of Traditional Small Boats at the Wilson Museum

A Gathering of Traditional Small Boats

rowboatsIt’s a boat show!

No, it’s a ribbon-cutting!

No, it’s a program with speakers!

No, it’s a yummy food event!

Actually, it’s ALL OF THE ABOVE!

The Downeast Chapter of the Traditional Small Craft Association is pleased to sponsor the dedication of the Wilson Museum’s new Antique Boat Exhibit and Boat Shop on July 3, 2019 beginning mid-morning. This will be a great opportunity to see a wide variety of small boats and chat with their knowledgeable and enthusiastic owners.

At 11 a.m. Penobscot Marine Museum Curator, Ben Fuller, will give a talk entitled On Matinicus It’s a Double-Ender about small peapods.

The aromas from the outdoor bake oven will entice attendees across the street at noon to sample Museum-made bean-hole beans, pulled pork, blueberry buckle, as well as a variety of smoked fish (mackerel, alewives, or smelt) from the Downeast Salmon Federation’s smoker.

Wood ShopAt 2 p.m. take part in the Exhibit and Boat Shop ribbon cutting and dedication ceremony followed by Tom Jackson, senior editor at WoodenBoat, giving a talk entitled Modern Small Craft: Building on Tradition about the current use of traditional small craft. Then, to top it off, there will be a showing of the WoodenBoat video The 2015 Small Reach Regatta provided by Small Reach Regatta.

This event is free and open to the public! It’s a boat-enthusiast’s dream day—don’t miss it!

 

NOAA Releases New Version of Chart No. 1

The chart of charts has been updated. This article at NOAA’s website details the revisions that appear in the new version.

As always, the chart is available for free download through NOAA’s site, and they say that you can buy the new printed version through four approved printers and distributors. Chart No. 1, “describes the symbols, abbreviations, and terms used on paper NOAA nautical charts and for displaying NOAA electronic navigational chart (NOAA ENC®) data on Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS). The document also shows paper chart symbols used by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and symbols specified by the International Hydrographic Organization.”

NOAA Office of Coast Survey

Chart No. 1 as a booklet. Image courtesy of NOAA.

Man Who Crossed Bering Strait in Dinghy Deported from Russia

John Martin III had originally been planning to sail to China aboard his 8′ Walker Bay dinghy, but he ended up in Russia two weeks after his departure. He’s now been deported about six months after his arrival, and has written blog entries about his time there.

Many people sharing this story or reading the background have found that Martin’s past is both complicated and dramatic. From a small-boat standpoint, he’s very lucky to have had a safe arrival and a safe deportation from Russia, but it also demonstrates how boats are taking care of us probably just as much as we’re taking care of them.

Walker Bay dinghy and gear laid out on a tarp in RussiaJohn Martin

The 8′ Walker Bay dinghy and gear John Martin had with him.

New England Junket: 2nd Annual Junk Rig Gathering

The New England Junket will happen this year on Labor Day weekend, in Gouldsboro Bay, Maine. This is a gathering of Junk Rig Association members and others who sail junk rigged boats and/or are interested in junk rig. Emphasis is on sailing together and visiting, in the context of sharing information and interest in junk rigs.

Accommodations: Protected anchorages are nearby and a small number of moorings are available. Camping is available about 3 miles away at Mainayr Campground, which boasts tidal access to Joy Bay, at the head of Gouldsboro Bay. There are two nearby boat ramps, one tidal, the other deepwater and paved. One is on Joy Bay, and the other on the west shore of Gouldsboro Bay, just south of the narrows into Joy Bay.

Gorgeous sailing is to be had in Gouldsboro Bay and outside of it to the east and west. Gouldsboro Bay is approximately 10 miles east of Mount Desert Island and Acadia National Park, and about halfway between Penobscot Bay and the Bay of Fundy.

For more information, or to RSVP, please contact Shemaya, at shemayalaurel@yahoo.com

For online information, see:
Junk Rig Sailing Facebook page (scroll down for event notice)
Junk Rig Association member events listing

OkoumeFest 2018

Chesapeake Light Craft will present its 20th annual small boat rendezvous, OkoumeFest, on Friday and Saturday, May 18-19, 2018.

“Okoume” is the plantation-grown African hardwood used in tens of thousands of CLC’s build-your-own-boat kits. OkoumeFest features an open house with technical seminars on Friday at the CLC plant in Annapolis, and on Saturday an on-the-water rendezvous at Matapeake State Park on Kent Island. This event is RAIN OR SHINE. Please note that if thunderstorms are detected nearby we’ll bring the boats off the water.

The Friday seminars are informative and fun, but the highlight of OkoumeFest always comes on Saturday, when we bring virtually everything in our shop over to the beach at Matapeake for our friends to paddle, row, sail, and generally put through their paces. We also encourage fellow boatbuilders to bring their homebuilt watercraft to show and compete for best-in-show honors and various awards.

OkoumeFest is also a special chance to try some of the boats, such as PocketShip, that they can’t usually take on the road with them. You’ll also be able to try out new designs, such as the Jimmy Skiff II, Tenderly XP, and the Waterlust Sailing Canoe. Attendance is free on both days this year, but please RSVP so that CLC can plan for the hordes.

Friday [schedule] features an open house at the CLC factory with shop tours, boatbuilding seminars with experts, and a cookout. Everything in the CLC store will be discounted, including boat kits.

On Saturday [schedule] the event moves to Matapeake State Park on Kent Island, where nearly 60 CLC boats will line the beach. They welcome you to try out boats all day long, or bring your own to show off.

Sydney Flying Squadron to Visit Annapolis, MD

This just in from the news ticker:

The National Sailing Hall of Fame (NSHOF) announced that sailors from the Sydney Flying Squadron, Australia’s oldest open boat sailing club, will be visiting Annapolis on September 13-17, 2017 to participate in a race regatta featuring classic American Sandbaggers and historical Australian 18-Footers. The Squadron is shipping their own fleet of historical 18-foot skiffs from Australia to Annapolis specifically for this event. They will also race their boats in the 8th Annual Classic Wooden Sailboat Rendezvous & Race on September 16-17.

The historical 18-foot skiffs, considered by many to be the fastest class of sailing skiffs, began racing on Australia’s Sydney Harbor in 1892 and later in New Zealand. They’re called “Aussie 18s” by their owners.

The 18-Footers will be launching everyday at 10:30 a.m. from the Annapolis Sailing School and will be on display to the public at 11:00 a.m. on the mornings of September 13, 14, 15 and 16 at the National Sailing Fame docks. For complete schedule of events for the boats and their crew click here.

About the boats:

ABERDARE

Skipper: John Winning
Original built: 1932
Modern build: 2000
Builder: Robert Tearne
Beam: 7′
When launched on the Brisbane River this revolutionary skiff was an instant success – Aust 18’ champion four years in a row from 1933 to 1937 (skipper Vic Vaughan). Revolutionary because she was a heel-less skiff type 18 footer with seven foot beam and a depth of only two feet.

 

ALRUTH

Skipper: Ian Smith
Original built: 1947
Modern build: 2001
Builder: Robert Tearne
Beam: 7′
Dedicated to and assisted by the Beashel family, who were famous 18-footer sailors. One of the key marks within Sydney Harbour is named the “Beashel Buoy“ and the name “Alruth” is a combination of Alf Beashel and his wife’s name Ruth. Their grandson, Colin, represented Australia in sailing and was Australian Team Captain and Flag Bearer at the 2004 Athens Olympic Games.

 

AUSTRALIA IV

Skipper: David Swales
Original built: 1943
Modern build: 2007
Builder: Billy Fisher, Jr.
Beam: 7′
Original built in 1943 by Bill Fisher, Sr. and his sons Tom and Jimmy. It was club champion in 1944 and 1945 and State Champion in 1945 and 1946. Replica built by Bill Fisher, Jr. as a tribute to his family, from a model owned and passed down through the generations.

2017 Small Reach Regatta a Success

What a turnout and what a variety of boats this year at the Traditional Small Craft Association‘s Small Reach Regatta, held in Brooklin, Maine. The gathering is a labor of love for WoodenBoat Senior Editor Tom Jackson, who returned from a small boat raid in Sweden wanting to have a similar event here in Maine. They’ve been at it for 11 years now.

Here’s a look at the end of their lunch stop on Babson Island as the boats got underway:

The Downeast TSCA’s website explains, “The idea of the SRR is to gather together small sail-and-oars boats for sailing, with the same kind of camaraderie and appreciation that the ERR has established. The boats typically sail courses of 5 to 15 nautical miles on three successive days (Thursday through Saturday) starting from the waterfront anchorage each morning and returning each afternoon. There is no racing, but participants always show keen interest in how their boats perform against others. Many of the boats were built of wood by their owners themselves, and last year seven of them were even designed by their builders.”